Cable concerns: Reports suggest criminals are now targeting the £200 leads used by EV owners to charge their vehicles Concerns are growing that a new type of car crime could hit the streets of Britain, as thieves target the nation’s growing number of electric vehicle owners

Cable concerns: Reports suggest criminals are now targeting the £200 leads used by EV owners to charge their vehicles

Cable concerns: Reports suggest criminals are now targeting the £200 leads used by EV owners to charge their vehicles

Cable concerns: Reports suggest criminals are now targeting the £200 leads used by EV owners to charge their vehicles

Concerns are growing that a new type of car crime could hit the streets of Britain, as thieves target the nation’s growing number of electric vehicle owners.

A number of reports have suggested that there has already been a spike in cases of EV drivers having their charging cables pinched — the leads used to plug into a wallbox, public device or the mains to replenish the batteries in their cars.

Crafty thieves are fully aware of their value — and the worth of the metals inside the cables. 

With many drivers leaving the leads unattended while they charge during the day and night or when they’re vehicles isn’t plugged in, criminals are snatching them and making away with the valuable cords that are worth around £200 each.

It comes as drivers of petrol cars continue to fall victim to the spate of catalytic converter thefts that have been spreading across the country in the last couple of years, which in worst cases are writing off perfectly good vehicles.

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‘Car chargers are particularly appealing to thieves because they can be sold for up to £200 and they are selling them everywhere, eBay, Facebook, and to dodgy scrap dealers,’ said company spokesman Mark Hall. 

‘And they can be pretty costly and inconvenient for you to replace, so it’s best to keep it locked away from the crooks.’

With half a million plug-in cars on Britain's roads, criminals have more prey to target when pinching charging cables

With half a million plug-in cars on Britain's roads, criminals have more prey to target when pinching charging cables

With half a million plug-in cars on Britain’s roads, criminals have more prey to target when pinching charging cables

Just last month the Transport Secretary, Grant Shapps, announced that there are now over half a million plug-in cars on Britain’s roads — either fully electric vehicles or plug-in hybrids.

With the Government set to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2030, the shift to electrification is predicted to gather pace at a dramatic rate over the course of the next decade.

This will offer up yet more targets for light-fingered criminals, who previously targeted copper in telephone cables and lead from church roofs to make an easy buck. If you have any concerns concerning exactly where and how to use auto insurance philadelphia pa, you can make contact with us at our webpage.  

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS money" data-version="2" id="mol-0795bea0-c85d-11eb-8889-f5cec4b5c69b" website of electric car charging cables could be next wave of car crime